Common Oral Health Fictions: The Facts

In centuries past, people cleaned their teeth with bits of wood and bark. Modern dentistry has progressed into an established and reliable medical practice based on science and technology. Some people still adhere to myths and “old wive’s tales” surrounding oral health. Believing these fictions can adversely affect how we take care our mouth and teeth. In order to have strong oral health, let’s separate the myths from the facts:

Myth #1: There is no need to visit the dentist if you do not see problems.

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Just because there are no visible problems with your teeth or gums does not necessarily mean they are healthy. Visit your dentist for an examination and cleaning twice a year. Having expert care can help prevent minor issues from becoming serious dental problems.

Myth #2: A hard-bristled toothbrush cleans teeth better.

teeth

A hard-bristled toothbrush can hurt gums and teeth enamel. Dentists recommend using soft toothbrushes to gently clean your teeth, gums, and tongue.

Myth #3: Tooth decay is caused by sweet, sugary foods.

Many of us are told to avoid eating sweets foods and candies. However, consuming sweets (and even acidic fruits) in moderation won’t necessarily cause decay if you rinse your mouth with water. A few minutes later, brush and floss your teeth. By removing sugar/sucrose and acid from your mouth, bacteria will be less likely to grow and thrive.

Myth #4: Old age increases risk of tooth loss.

Common Oral Health Fictions: The Facts

Risk of tooth loss does not develop with age. Tooth loss is largely attributed to poor oral hygiene, genetics, smoking, and oral health problems such as periodontal disease. Even very young children will lose teeth if their parents do not clean their gums and encourage strong oral health care from birth.

Myth #5: Whiter Teeth Mean Healthier Teeth

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Many people dream of having white teeth. However, clean-looking teeth are not always healthy. Infection can be present both internally or externally. The colour of teeth varies from one person to another. The “natural colour” for a healthy set of teeth is a shade slightly darker than pure “white.”

The best way to protect your oral health is by talking to dentists with years of experience. Call Ohana Dental Clinic at (905) 697-3440.

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